Monday, May 23, 2022

TV Picks - Week of May 23

Stranger Things returns for its fourth season on Netflix this Friday. The Emmy-winning 80's pop-culture filled series is one of my favorite rollercoasters to ride.

I love coasters. Always have. Hitting the Thunderbolt, Jack Rabbit and all the others at Kennywood growing up in Pittsburgh. Graduating to The Cyclone after I moved to New York. Taking my family to Hershey every summer to tackle the Comet, Lightning Racer, Sooper Dooper Looper, and every exciting new ride that got built. If there's a rollercoaster, you'll find me strapped in.

Once you’re looking for them, parallels between Stranger Things and rollercoasters smack you in the face. You can't wait to experience both, and each has its ups and downs. If it's a good ride, you exit anxious to do it all over again. But sometimes you walk away feeling sick to your stomach.

I'm rolling with this metaphor, so let's break it down:

Anticipation - Whether you're a child or all grown up, as you head to the amusement park you're thinking about the rides. The more thrilling, the higher the anticipation. You just can't wait to get there. That feeling has persisted since the first Stranger Things episode The Duffer Brothers offered up in 2016. You're immediately sucked in from the opening Stephen King font-ed credits. There's horror, laughter, romance, government conspiracy, other worlds, nostalgia, and a little bit of Dungeons & Dragons. But every season, and every ride, leaves you wanting more.

The Initial Thrill - It's hard to describe the first time you ride a great coaster. The chain clicking as you slowly make your way up the first hill, the big drop, the turns, the speed and the abrupt braking at the end. The first season of Stranger Things had that feeling as it captured the world's attention. There wasn't anything else like it on TV. The kids and their hometown of Hawkins, Indiana were innocent and perfect. Millie Bobby Brown came from another world and was known as a number. Winona Ryder was back playing a worried mom. David Harbour fit right in as the bearded lawman who went by his last name. Matthew Modine was the requisite bad guy. Oh, and the Upside Down didn't hurt either. Throwback childhood innocence with plenty of 80's nostalgia mixed in and a battle of good versus evil. Couldn't get enough.

The Second Time Around - Sade once sang it's never as good as the first time, but I don't think she was referring to roller coasters. After you've been on once, you know what to expect. Sure, you enjoy the ride, but you know what's coming. That's the problem with expectations - they're difficult to meet when you set the bar so high. The second season of Stranger Things felt like another roller coaster ride. You knew what was coming. The kids were maturing and kept apart for most of the series to flesh out the characters. Mistake. Millie Bobby Brown was unleashed at the end, but there were others out there numerically just like her. You could see the jokes coming and the battle that would ensue. Steve and Dustin shined, but that innocence from the first season was lost.

Three Is A Magic Number - An initial thrill ride keeps you coming back for more, and gradually you appreciate the twists and turns in spite of their predictability. Renovations have been done and enhancements have been made. Roller coasters have peaks and valleys, but the best ones surprise you right when you feel like things have slowed down. The thrill is still there. Season three got back to what made the first season work. The kids were back together. The mystery was back. Good was going to battle evil in a mall filled with plenty of inside references. The Russians got involved. It was a fun ride with a ridiculous ending. But it was satisfying.

Three years and one pandemic later, we’ve arrived at season four. Everyone’s hit puberty and left Indiana. Eleven has no powers. Hopper is a Russian prisoner who somehow survived a fire that would devastate a city. We know what's coming… a new monster will enter that portal in Hawkins, and our heroes will return to fight another day in the 80's.

Can't wait to strap in.

Here's what else is worth watching this week…

SEASON PREMIERES

That Damn Michael Che (HBO Max)
Thursday, May 26th

Friends tell me Weekend Update is must-see TV. I don't always agree with my friends. But the second season of Colin Jost's co-anchor's show continues to hit the mark. The first season was filled of stories and biting satire that should be on SNL. Thankfully, HBO Max provides a different outlet for Che to express himself and make us laugh.

Obi-Wan Kenobi (Disney+)
Friday, May 27th

"Help me Obi-Wan Kenobi, you're my only hope." Those words from Carrie Fisher in 1977 live on with a Jedi great getting his own Disney+ series. Ewan McGregor returns from those horrible sequels to play not so Old Ben Kenobi and picks up after Luke's dad betrayed him to go to the dark side. Hayden Christensen also returns to emote as a young Darth Vader.

The Mandalorian proved that stories about The Force can thrive. Boba Fett got interesting when the Mandalorian (and Grogu) showed up. Obi-Wan has a lot more history to work with. Jedis are being hunted down, and this has the potential to be something special. We know Ben ends up in a cave watching over Luke… now we'll find out why. 

FOREIGN AFFAIRS

Prehistoric Planet (Apple TV+) – Richard Attenborough's brother David covers the wildlife when dinosaurs ruled the planet. Monday.

THIS WEEK’S STIHTGT!
(Shows That I Hope To Get To!)

Keeper of the Ashes: The Oklahoma Girl Scout Murders (Hulu) – Oklahoma Girl Scout Kristin Chenoweth narrates the true story of three scouts who were murdered at camp. Tuesday.

Ricky Gervais: Supernature (Netflix) – Stand-up special from a comedian who truly doesn't care who he pisses off. Tuesday.

Somebody Feed Phil (Netflix) – The creator of Everybody Loves Raymond continues his worldwide quest in search of something to eat. Wednesday.

GREATEST HITS
(Really Good Shows You May Have Missed)

This Week's Pick: The Great (Hulu) – A smart comedy about Catherine the Great and her ascent in Russia aristocracy. The jokes are dark, there's plenty of innuendo, and the ensemble acting is as wonderful as the writing. Elle Fanning is perfectly cast as Catherine, but Nicholas Hoult playing her husband Peter steals the show as the obnoxious young Emperor. Huzzah!

Previous Picks:
Atypical (Netflix)
Sherlock (PBS)
Magic City (Peacock)
Imposters (Netflix)
Episodes (Showtime/Hulu)
For All Mankind (Apple TV+)
Abbott Elementary (ABC)
Damages (Hulu)
Luther (HBO Max)
Downton Abbey (Netflix)
Justified (Hulu)
The Good Wife (Paramount+)
Freaks & Geeks (Hulu)
Patriot (Amazon Prime Video)
Battlestar Galactica (Peacock)
The Split (Amazon Prime Video)
Bordertown (Netflix)
Halt and Catch Fire (AMC+)

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If you love or hate my picks, I'd love to hear from you.

Get vaccinated. Get a booster. Stay healthy and safe!

Monday, May 16, 2022

TV Picks - Week of May 16

Love On The Spectrum is back this Wednesday, but where did those Australian accents go? Netflix's Love On The Spectrum U.S. is an adaptation of the Aussie series chronicling autistic adults who are looking for love.

I am no fan of dating shows. Most are completely contrived with good-looking people who want to be TV stars. They are not looking for a real relationship. They are looking to get famous.

The original Love on the Spectrum is a rare exception. All the guys and gals down under are actually looking for someone special, and the authenticity of their feelings and respect of their families is palpable. It's a wonderful show that truly makes you feel for anyone who is involved.

A lot of the charm comes from the shooting locations, but even more is derived from their accents. Accents pack a lot of punch. Hulu's Normal People benefited tremendously from those Irish tongues. Archie and Edith Bunker wouldn't have been themselves without their affectations on All In The Family. If you have a British accent, I automatically assume you're ten times smarter than I am (although the Cockney makes me think you're in Mary Poppins).

Naturally Netflix programming execs thought "why don't we do an Americanized version of our hit series?" Lots of people loved Atypical which is an autistic coming of age story (see below). There are plenty of autistic people dating in the United States, so let's just adapt the series to America!

But adapting an international hit isn't as easy as it sounds. For every The Office or Veep, there's a Coupling or Us & Them. Be careful what you import.

The good news here is that producers didn't mess with a winning formula. The stories are sweet, the cast is charming, and the tugs at your heartstrings are still in check with a sharp sense of humor. Even the Australian voice behind the camera remains the same, retaining a nice taste of the vocal comfort from the first series. If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.

Love on the Spectrum puts "reality" into a reality dating show. These bachelors and bachelorettes actually care more about each other than the cameras that follow them. That’s something worth celebrating.

Here's what else is worth watching this week…

SEASON PREMIERES

My Next Guest Needs No Introduction (NETFLIX)
Friday, May 20th

It seems like eons since David Letterman said goodbye to his long-running late-night talk show. Many thought Dave would pull a Carson and never be seen again. Many were wrong.

The bearded wonder returns for a fourth season of his Netflix talk show completely in control. This season's guests include Will Smith (taped pre-slap), Cardi B, Kevin Durant, Billie Eilish, Julia Louis-Dreyfus and Ryan Reynolds. In other words, people who Dave genuinely wants to talk to. Watch clip

George Carlin's American Dream (HBO)
Friday, May 20th 8pm

Judd Apatow has helmed many projects that have made us laugh, and more recently he’s assumed the role of comedy preservationist. After profiling Garry Shandling's Zen diaries just a few years ago, Judd has fixed his sights on George Carlin.

The legendary comedian was so much more than those seven dirty words. This two-part documentary examines his life, career, and overwhelming influence on those now considered to be legends in the world of stand-up comedy. 

FOREIGN AFFAIRS

The Ipcress File (AMC+) – A cold war spy thriller set in London and Berlin in the 1960's based on the book. Thursday.

THIS WEEK’S STIHTGT!
(Shows That I Hope To Get To!)

Angelyne (Peacock) – Emmy Rossum thinks she's famous in L.A. but no one knows who she is. Thursday.

The G World with Adam Conover (Netflix) – The host who ruins everything takes a close look at the effects of our government. Thursday.

Night Sky (Amazon) – J.K. Simmons and Sissy Spacek are a retired couple who just happen to have a passage to another planet in their backyard. Friday.

Now and Then (Apple TV+) – Five college friends reunite 20 years after the sixth member of their crew died. Friday.

GREATEST HITS
(Really Good Shows You May Have Missed)

This Week's Pick: Atypical (Netflix) – This charming comedy revolves around an autistic child navigating his family and high school while trying to get out of the house on his own. Keir Gilchrist and Brigette Lundy-Paine are fantastic as the kids, and parents Jennifer Jason Leigh and Michael Rapaport play their parts just right. It's a funny, poignant look at what it takes to grow up in today's world and all the peer pressure and support (or lack thereof) that comes with it.

Previous Picks:
Sherlock (PBS)
Magic City (Peacock)
Imposters (Netflix)
Episodes (Showtime/Hulu)
For All Mankind (Apple TV+)
Abbott Elementary (ABC)
Damages (Hulu)
Luther (HBO Max)
Downton Abbey (Netflix)
Justified (Hulu)
The Good Wife (Paramount+)
Freaks & Geeks (Hulu)
Patriot (Amazon Prime Video)
Battlestar Galactica (Peacock)
The Split (Amazon Prime Video)
Bordertown (Netflix)
Halt and Catch Fire (AMC+)

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If you love or hate my picks, I'd love to hear from you.

Get vaccinated. Get a booster. Stay healthy and safe!

Tuesday, May 10, 2022

TV Picks - Week of May 9

Hacks returns this Thursday, and it couldn't come at a better time. Deborah Vance may have lost her Vegas residency, but thankfully she's still out there making audiences and her entourage laugh uncomfortably.

The first season of the HBO Max comedy was a surprise hit with Emmy-winning Jean Smart leading the way as a veteran Vegas comedian. Young writer Ava (Hannah Einbinder) convinced Deborah to get more real in her stand-up, but old habits are hard to break. Ava's season one issues are the catalyst for the new season, and any fears of the duo being "too nice" to one another are immediately erased.

It's easy to draw parallels between Deborah Vance and Joan Rivers, but Hacks is much more than that. Deborah's team is filled with rich characters with their own storylines and plenty of laughs.

The first season explored the relationship between new and old comedy styles through its characters. Deborah and Ava learned from each other, and the out-of-touch veteran faced some hard truths while espousing plenty of wisdom to her younger colleague.

If a comedy gets nominated for 13 Emmys (and wins 3) in its inaugural season, critics like me are looking for a sophomore slump. Many series lose the edge that made them compelling to watch in the first place, but that doesn't happen here. The contrast in Deborah's and Ava's lifestyles sometimes goes a little too far in stereotypical situations, but their relationship holds up well.

The relationship that rivals Deborah and Ava in season two is between Ava's agent Jimmy (Paul W. Downs) and his assistant Kayla (Megan Stalter). Their fathers each got them their respective agency jobs, and the free-spirited Kayla continues to drive Jimmy nuts. He thinks she's his biggest hindrance and does something about it with unforeseen consequences. These two just make me laugh.

It's hard not to spoil the six episodes I've already seen, but let's just say that the laughs and awkward situations don't stop coming. Jean Smart might have to make room on her shelf for another Emmy.

Here's what else is worth watching this week…

SEASON PREMIERES

Candy (Hulu)
Monday, May 9th

Jessica Biel has been making some really good TV (check out The Sinner). Here she plays 80's Texas housewife turned axe murderer Candy Montgomery.

Candy comes from the creators of The Act, who clearly know their way around suburban misfortune. The five-part series is set to unspool over the course of the week, with new episodes dropping daily starting tonight. It’s an interesting move by Hulu, and could establish a new pattern for future series. 

Conversations with Friends (Hulu)
Sunday, May 15th

The team the brought us Normal People returns with a new Sally Rooney adaptation. This time two college students in Dublin get involved with an older married couple.

The new series doesn’t have a lot in common with Normal People, but once again the actors good looking, and the relationships are complicated and messy.

FOREIGN AFFAIRS

Breeders (FX) – Martin Freeman shines in the third season of this dark comedy that continues to prove parenting isn't so easy. Monday at 10pm.

THIS WEEK’S STIHTGT!
(Shows That I Hope To Get To!)

The Essex Serpent (Apple TV+) – Claire Danes moves from Victorian London to Essex where a mythical creature lurks about. Friday.

The Kids in the Hall (Amazon) – The legendary Canadian comedy troupe reunites with notable guests for more sketches and head crushing in this new series. Friday.

The Lincoln Lawyer (Netflix) – David E. Kelley takes a crack at the Michael Connelly book turned film chronicling L.A. lawyer Mickey Haller. Friday.

The Time Traveler's Wife (HBO) – Stephen Moffat takes a crack at the Audrey Niffenegger book turned film chronicling a couple dealing with a time-traveling disorder. Sunday at 9pm.

GREATEST HITS
(Really Good Shows You May Have Missed)

This Week's Pick: Sherlock (PBS) – With creator Stephen Moffat and stars Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman all appearing in new releases this week, so what better time to recommend this excellent modern take on Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson? Each episode is a mini-movie, and although the cases will be familiar to some, the writing and acting jump right off the screen.

Previous Picks:
Fauda (Netflix)
Magic City (Peacock)
Imposters (Netflix)
Episodes (Showtime/Hulu)
For All Mankind (Apple TV+)
Abbott Elementary (ABC)
Damages (Hulu)
Luther (HBO Max)
Downton Abbey (Netflix)
Justified (Hulu)
The Good Wife (Paramount+)
Freaks & Geeks (Hulu)
Patriot (Amazon Prime Video)
Battlestar Galactica (Peacock)
The Split (Amazon Prime Video)
Bordertown (Netflix)
Halt and Catch Fire (AMC+)

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If you love or hate my picks, I'd love to hear from you.

Get vaccinated. Get a booster. Stay healthy and safe!

Monday, May 2, 2022

TV Picks - Week of May 2

If you haven’t seen the French documentary series The Staircase, tune in Thursday to watch HBO Max’s starry dramatization of the story spoiler-free. Don't do a Google search, don't ask your friends, just go in cold. You may now skip down to the Season Premieres section below.

Still reading? Good.

That means you know that a suburban wife falls down the stairs of her home and dies. Her husband maintains that it was an unfortunate accident, but there's plenty of doubt and only his word to trust. The mystery extends overseas, and many trials take place over the years.

In its first iteration, a 8-part series released in 2004, The Staircase documented the original trial of accused husband Michael Peterson. The filmmakers returned to the story with two followups in 2012 and 2018 as the legal drama continued to unfold, and the entire 13-part series ultimately found its way to Netflix.

In keeping with TV’s favorite current trend, the latest version of The Staircase arrives this Thursday, this time with award-winning actors in the lead roles. I usually prefer the documentary to the Hollywood retelling. Most of the time you get Joe vs. Carole instead of Tiger King — great actors and a compelling story, but nowhere near as good as the documentary. The original French series was gripping, and the followups maintained that hold on the audience.

On rare occasions, the new version can be even better. Colin Firth and Toni Collette are perfectly cast as the leads of this fictionalized take. Juliette Binoche, Parker Posey, Sophie Turner, Michael Stuhlbarg and countless other actors we love to see on screen join them. All the right moves are being made casting-wise.

Whether the series can build on that remains to be seen. Here's the good news… if we don't like what we see, we can just switch over to Netflix and watch the real thing.

Here's what else is worth watching this week…

SEASON PREMIERES

The Pentaverate (Netflix)
Thursday, May 6th

Mike Meyers is back on TV. This time around he's playing a Canadian journalist who digs deep into a secret society that has controlled the world for centuries. Don't worry, he’s also playing seven other characters in this comedic miniseries.

Meyers is a brilliant comedian who always takes big non-traditional swings. Some have been enormous hits, while others have been misses. I respect that he always tries to do something a little bit different. This six-episode take on the Illuminati will certainly be worth checking out. Watch trailer.

Bosch: Legacy (Amazon Freevee)
Friday, May 7th

Hieronymus Bosch is the gift that keeps on giving, and now we have a new spinoff on the free streaming service network previously known as IMDB TV. Titus Welliver reprises his role as Harry, who has left the LAPD to become a private detective. His daughter is a rookie cop on the force following in dad's footsteps.

I've read a bunch of the Bosch books and there are plenty of stories still to be told. The conflicted detective is such an enigmatic character, and Welliver continues to deliver an award-winning performance as the lead.

The Wilds Season 2 (Amazon)
Friday, May 6th

The first season of this drama set the current TV trend for plane crashes involving young athletic females (Yellowjackets owes this show a big thank you). Now the gals are back for season two to explore the aftermath of surviving on a deserted island unaware that they were being monitored all along.

The Lost parallels are obvious, but this show's Dharma initiative is much more upfront with Rachel Griffiths at the helm. The young actresses play off each other very well as they harbor secrets that perpetuate the Lord of the Flies mystery of their island. This season has a lot of explaining to do as we know who made it and who didn't… I think.

FOREIGN AFFAIRS

Tehran (Apple TV+) – Season 2 of the life of a Mossad hacker who infiltrates Tehran and gets trapped in the city. Glenn Close joins the cast of the Israeli thriller from the creators of Fauda. Friday.

THIS WEEK’S STIHTGT!
(Shows That I Hope To Get To!)

Spring Awakening: Those You've Known (HBO) – The cast reunites 15 years later for a one-night only concert. Tuesday.

Meltdown: Three Mile Island (Netflix) – Folks who were there recall the horrible accident at the nuclear power plant in Pennsylvania. Wednesday.

Girls5Eva (Peacock) – Amy Sedaris joins the second season of the reunited pop female singing foursome. Thursday.

Star Trek: Strange New Worlds (Paramount+) – Boldly going where no man has gone before a decade before James T. Kirk takes the bridge. Thursday.

GREATEST HITS (Really Good Shows You May Have Missed)

This Week's Pick: Fauda (Netflix) – A retired Israeli defense worker is enjoying retirement on his vineyard when an old enemy reemerges and he gets sucked back into his old world. This drama is as intense as they come, and you can't help but get sucked in to the suspenseful world of Middle Eastern conflict.

Previous Picks:
Magic City (Peacock)
Imposters (Netflix)
Episodes (Showtime/Hulu)
For All Mankind (Apple TV+)
Abbott Elementary (ABC)
Damages (Hulu)
Luther (HBO Max)
Downton Abbey (Netflix)
Justified (Hulu)
The Good Wife (Paramount+)
Freaks & Geeks (Hulu)
Patriot (Amazon Prime Video)
Battlestar Galactica (Peacock)
The Split (Amazon Prime Video)
Bordertown (Netflix)
Halt and Catch Fire (AMC+)

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If you love or hate my picks, I'd love to hear from you.

Get vaccinated. Get a booster. Stay healthy and safe!

Monday, April 25, 2022

TV Picks - Week of April 25

All the ingredients are right there for some great television. David Simon running the show with co-creator George Pelecanos. An adaptation of a non-fiction book by a Baltimore Sun journalist. The Baltimore police department at the center of it all.

Sound familiar?

There's a natural inclination to compare We Own This City, which premieres tonight at 9pm on HBO and HBO Max, to David Simon's masterpiece The Wire. I've always stood by my decades old claim that The Wire is the best drama to ever air on TV (Breaking Bad comes in second). Those two series had lots of bandwagon jumpers claiming to have been there all along, but the ratings say otherwise. Consider me OG on both.

Further fueling the flames of comparison will be the presence of many actors from The Wire who appear in We Own This City, albeit in different roles. These talented actors are often confused with the parts that they play. If you're a fan of The Wire, you'll be grinning throughout this six-part series seeing those faces back in Baltimore.

David Simon knows this comparison is coming, and my guess is that he doesn't really care. The Wire came from the six-part drama The Corner, which profiled what was really happening on the Baltimore streets. Simon is all about nailing the details and highlighting flaws to reveal who the "good guys" and "bad guys" really are. He takes a no-holds barred look at the police, and his television truly makes a difference.

We Own This City tells the true tale of the Baltimore PD's Gun Trace Task Force. The city of Baltimore should be credited as a co-star of the show. Since Homicide, this city continues to be the most powerful backdrop for any police corruption scandal and an illustration of "life in the streets." All the Law & Orders and similar knockoffs feel like they're shot on a set. Baltimore oozes through the screen and takes the stories being told to a different level.

The casting is top notch. Sergeant Wayne Jenkins, played by tailor-made for a David Simon project Jon Bernthal, has risen through the ranks by any means necessary. Baltimore's most hated cop Daniel Hersl is played by Josh Charles who brings a wicked smirk to a nasty role. Jamie Hector (The Wire’s Marlo) is back in Baltimore as detective Sean Suiter who contemplates testifying against his fellow police.

The task force had tremendous success taking guns, drugs and criminals off the streets. Their methods, however, were anything but scrupulous, and the final destination of what they removed often ended up in the task force members pockets. If the police were getting results, why would anyone care about how they were doing it? This fundamental flaw in the Baltimore PD is the sweet spot for David Simon and George Pelacanos.

The corruption of the task force leads to a federal investigation which gets down and dirty. The series is filled with examples of the task force taking things too far while being lauded for boosting the crime stats. This is a hard story to tell, and you're right in the middle of it. Once again, you're left wondering who is keeping the police in check.

It's exciting to see David Simon return to his city to produce more provocative television. If you haven't seen The Corner or The Wire, it’s past time that you jumped on the bandwagon. We Own This City is another worthy chapter in his Baltimore TV canon.

Here's what else is worth watching this week…

SEASON PREMIERES

2022 NFL Draft (ABC, ESPN, NFL Network)
Thursday, April 28th – Saturday April 30th

I've written before about growing up with the NFL Draft and the impact it's had on my life. What used to be a weekday sports fan's precious secret has become a three-day primetime extravaganza with plenty of hype and a little bit of substance.

The first round of the draft takes place Thursday at 8pm on ABC as 32 picks will be stretched out for three hours. Rounds two and three happen Friday night, and the remaining four rounds take place on Saturday.

The Offer (Paramount+)
Thursday, April 28th

The Godfather rightfully sits atop most lists of the best films ever made. The 70's classic still has an impact on current pop culture as evidenced by this new show about the making of Coppola’s masterpiece.

Miles Teller stars as Albert S. Ruddy who is hired to produce an adaptation of Mario Puzo's novel. Assembling the creative team provides plenty of conflict and the involvement of the mob itself. We've all seen the final product, and this 10-part series shows everything it took to get it on the big screen. Watch trailer.

Ozark (Netflix)
Friday, April 29th Season 4, Part 2

The Byrdes are running out of options as this series comes to an end. The final season picks up right where it left off in the aftermath of some major characters meeting their demise. Marty and Wendy continue to search for a way out of their circumstances and find inevitable trouble with family and friends along the way.

Jason Bateman, Laura Linney and Julia Garner continue their acting clinic doing bad things while believing their intentions are good. There's plenty of nostalgia and callbacks as the series draws to a close in the mighty Midwest. Raising a family of four is never easy with secrets as extensive as this family has. Breaking Bad comparisons are unfair, but Ozark stands on its own as an entertaining dark drama that leaves you questioning your own morals. Watch trailer.

FOREIGN AFFAIRS

Bang Bang Baby (Amazon) – Based on the true story of the youngest female member of the Milanese mob in Italy. Thursday.

THIS WEEK’S STIHTGT!
(Shows That I Hope To Get To!)

David Spade: Nothing Personal (Netflix) – First Netflix stand-up special for the very funny comedian with fresh takes on everything around us. Tuesday.

Under The Banner Of Heaven (Hulu) – Adaptation of the Krakauer novel about a murder in Utah and questioning Mormon faith. Thursday.

Made For Love (HBO Max) – Cristin Miloti returns for a second season with a chip in her head battling love and technology. Thursday.

Shining Girls (Apple TV+) – Reporter Elisabeth Moss teams with Wagner Moura following a string of murders that mirror her own assault from six years ago. Friday.

I Love That For You (Showtime) – Vanessa Bayer finds her calling as a new spokesperson for a QVC channel where Molly Shannon is the reigning queen. Sunday at 8:30pm.

GREATEST HITS
(Really Good Shows You May Have Missed)

This Week's Pick: Magic City (Peacock) – Underrated drama centered around a Miami Beach hotel in the 1950s as things are getting interesting with Cuba. Jeffrey Dean Morgan stars as former cabana boy turned hotel owner Ike Evans who charms his way through a rough crowd in the hippest hotel on the beach.

Previous Picks:
Imposters (Netflix)
Episodes (Showtime/Hulu)
For All Mankind (Apple TV+)
Abbott Elementary (ABC)
Damages (Hulu)
Luther (HBO Max)
Downton Abbey (Netflix)
Justified (Hulu)
The Good Wife (Paramount+)
Freaks & Geeks (Hulu)
Patriot (Amazon Prime Video)
Battlestar Galactica (Peacock)
The Split (Amazon Prime Video)
Bordertown (Netflix)
Halt and Catch Fire (AMC+)

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If you love or hate my picks, I'd love to hear from you.

Get vaccinated. Get a booster. Stay healthy and safe!